Coast Salish artist Maynard Johnny Jr.’s artwork unveiled on new ferry

0

The inspiration for the design came from the herons that frequent the west coast of British Columbia and historically lead anglers to where fish were plentiful.

Content of the article

BC Ferries has unveiled its latest ship, the Salish Heron, adorned with art by Coast Salish artist Johnny Maynard Jr.

Content of the article

The Duncan-based artist visited a facility in Richmond earlier this month, where he was able to view his completed artwork on the ferry, which is set to hit British Columbia waters this spring.

“My heron started out as a six-inch-by-two-inch sketch, so to see it in such a large scale on a BC Ferries ship is amazing,” said Johnny Jr., whose Native name is Thii Hayqwtun and who is a member of the Penelakut First Nation.

The artist made the April 15 trip with her daughter Anola Johnny and her grandson.

“I hope my daughter and my grandchildren will see the Salish heron and know that you can achieve something special when you think about it,” he said. “When they see my art on such a large scale, I hope they will be influenced by it and have the ambition to pursue their goals. I have always wanted to influence my daughter and my grandchildren to move forward in a positive way.

Content of the article

We apologize, but this video failed to load.

The art, which features a heron’s wings, tail and beak, spans about seven stories laid to the side and wraps the length of the ship. Johnny Jr. was selected from 37 artists for the opportunity to showcase his art on a BC Ferries ship.

The inspiration for the design came from the herons that frequent the west coast of British Columbia and historically lead anglers to where fish were plentiful.

The Salish Heron is the fourth Salish-class ship to feature Indigenous art on her hull. It is identical to three other Salish-class ferries built in 2016 and can carry around 138 vehicles and up to 600 passengers and crew.

Johnny Jr. was born in Campbell River in 1973 and is of Coast Salish and Kwakwaka’wakw descent. Bright, vivid colors and striking linework are hallmarks of her work, which honors Coast Salish references and history.

Coast Salish artist Maynard Johnny Jr. (whose Indigenous name is Thii Hayqwtun) traveled to Richmond, BC from his studio in Duncan in April 2022 to see his art unveiled on the last ship of BC Ferries, the Salish Heron, pictured here.  This is the fourth Salish-class ship to be painted with native art.  The ship can carry at least 138 vehicles and up to 600 passengers and crew.
Coast Salish artist Maynard Johnny Jr. (whose Indigenous name is Thii Hayqwtun) traveled to Richmond, BC from his studio in Duncan in April 2022 to see his art unveiled on the last ship of BC Ferries, the Salish Heron, pictured here. This is the fourth Salish-class ship to be painted with native art. The ship can carry at least 138 vehicles and up to 600 passengers and crew. Photo by HANDOUT/BC FERRIES /PNG

More news, less ads: Our in-depth journalism is possible thanks to the support of our subscribers. For just $3.50 a week, you can get unlimited, lightweight access to the Vancouver Sun, The Province, National Post and 13 other Canadian news sites. Support us by subscribing today: The Vancouver Sun | Province

Share.

Comments are closed.